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Have I mentioned that I love art? When it comes to the blues, being sad, bored or any kind of suffering I never cease to be amazed at the power art has to lift me out of myself and place me back down - almost spontaneously - somewhere better: restored, grateful, awed and inspired. To begin with today was one of those days in Canberra, the ones without the sun. Canberra, to me, can be hatefully, impossibly, miserably  cold but more often than not it's winter days are graced with a glacially sharp type of sunshine able to seek out the darkest corners of a bleak wintery soul. And yet when absent....
This weeks immunotherapy was really tough. A step backwards - tweaking the formula somewhat and changing 'brands' - something meant to lessen the side effects, not increase them. So when I woke up this morning with a fresh cold I was........not happy.
it took four hours of saying I was going out to pick up some buckwheat flour to actually making that happen, the dark cold outside the door that uninviting. Eventually though, out the door I got, my smallest companion in tow.
An excursion centred around purchasing Buckwheat might sound unexciting but the shop itself is in an older part of town, where the streets are especially pretty and, as everything is bought in bulk, they sell chunks of organic chocolate by the gram. Why that is how I get my smallest companion in tow of course.
Enlivened then by the bustling inside the shop and the smell of wood fires burning I made a decision to stop off in the next street at M16 Art Space to see the exhibitions. I'd caught sight of some photos of an exhibition by Elissa Crossing on photographic magazine Life in Canberra - beautiful paintings that had immediately enchanted me with their 'through the looking glass' kind of quality (no small due the also enchanting secondary interpretation through Andrew Sikorski's photographic lens, below) and felt it would be worth my effort making it in. And it was. I adored Crossing's use of circles and ellipses as canvas alluding to the perspective of a glimpse taken and of the viewer receiving fragmented views of a private space. The muted palette with small accents of red or mustard were moody and full also of the shadowy atmosphere and mystery of private spaces. Verdict? Will buy scratchie on Monday, win and purchase the lot.
The second main exhibition at M16 were some mesmerising photographic prints and tapestries by Tim Gresham. At first that combination - photography and tapestry - seemed a bit odd. But as i went through the works and begun to appreciate what he was highlighting in each subject (it wasn't always possible to identify the subject outside of organic and inorganic) i got an appreciation for the connection. In fact Gresham describes this perfectly on his blog:

  "Suggestive of music, the rhythmical imagery in both the photographs and tapestries reflect similar ideas of repetition and subtle disruption of pattern. I enjoy the contrast between the two mediums; the introspective, time consuming weaving, and the instant capture of photographic observation."


This above my favourite, the repetition and disruption, both meditative and mesmerising in effect. Really fantastic and worth seeing them all. Also worth checking out his blog if just to witness the like minded process involved in the tapestries.



Unfortunately I didn't have my camera on me as the members exhibition down the corridors of the building (and this seems always to be the case at M16) was just as engaging. Beautiful, varied works in paper, textiles, acrylics on wood, artists books....and only open for one last week. So much great art in Canberra and a good excuse to get out (and in) from the cold.

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